July 21, 2019
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Prepare to pay more for diapers, clorox and cat litter

 Student volunteers pass along diapers while helping to distribute relief supplies to people impacted by Hurricane Harvey, in Houston, Texas, USA, Sept. 3, 2017. EPA-EFE FILE/Brett Coomer / POOL

Student volunteers pass along diapers while helping to distribute relief supplies to people impacted by Hurricane Harvey, in Houston, Texas, USA, Sept. 3, 2017. EPA-EFE FILE/Brett Coomer / POOL

Madrid, Feb 10 (efe-epa).- Makers of household staples started raising prices last year on diapers, toilet paper and trash bags to offset higher commodity costs and boost profits. Some of those increases have yet to show up on store shelves, but executives are promising to raise even more prices this year, according to a report from the Dow Jones Newswires made available to EFE on Sunday.

Church & Dwight recently increased prices for about a third of its products, including Arm & Hammer cat litter and baking soda, and some OxiClean cleaning products.

"The good news is that competitors are raising price in those categories as we speak," Church & Dwight Chief Executive Matthew Farrell said on a conference call last week when the company reported higher quarterly sales and lower profits.

The company is now discussing more price increases with retailers, including for personal-care products, Farrell told analysts Tuesday.

Church & Dwight is one of several consumer-goods companies that have raised prices -- or pledged to do so -- in response to higher costs of raw materials and transportation as well as unfavorable foreign-currency swings.

As a result, consumers are being asked to pay more for Pampers and Huggies diapers, Bounty and Viva paper towels, Charmin and Scott toilet papers and Arm & Hammer baking soda, among other products.

The price increases are largely playing out in the companies' favor, particularly for those whose competitors responded with their own hikes, Wells Fargo Securities analyst Bonnie Herzog said, the Dow Jones report added.

Sales volumes of household and personal products in the US declined 1.4 percent in January, according to Sanford C. Bernstein's analysis of data from Nielsen. Dollar sales of those products rose 0.7 percent in the period, Bernstein said, indicating that the price increases, on balance, are padding the bottom lines at consumer-goods companies.

But even in a strong US economy, there are limits to how much brands can charge without losing some customers.

Tyler Aftab, a 35-year-old teacher in Green Brook, N.J., said he noticed at his local Costco last week that Charmin and Bounty, which were normally under $18 last year, were both being sold for about $23. Glad trash bags, normally under $15, were listed at about $19.

Aftab bought the Glad kitchen bags discounted for under $16. He opted to buy Costco's Kirkland Signature brand of paper towels instead of Bounty. He decided to not buy any toilet paper.

"I am a fairly loyal consumer of Charmin, but I will not pay $23 for the pack," Aftab said. "I will wait until those prices come down."

Clorox last year raised prices on about half of its portfolio, including its Glad trash bags and plastic wraps, which the company said helped it boost profit margins in the latest quarter. Yet Glad's competitors didn't follow with their own price increases as executives had expected, contributing to a sales decline in the period. To defend the brand's market share, the company would boost spending on promotions in the near term, executives said Monday.

Clorox said sales rose in other categories like cat litter and its namesake bleach, where it also raised prices recently.

CEO Benno Dorer last week voiced confidence in Clorox's pricing strategy over the long term, and the company expects to invest in new products. Higher prices for Kingsford charcoal and Burt's Bees products went into effect in December and February, respectively.

Starting in September, Procter & Gamble Co. began increasing prices on a rolling basis from around 4 percent to as much as 10 percent on various products, such as Pampers, Bounty, Charmin and Puffs brands. The increases will be mostly in place by this month, the Dow Jones report added.

The company in January reported that the higher prices led to an increase in organic sales, a closely watched metric that strips out currency moves, acquisitions and divestitures. The company raised its organic sales target for the year, while P&G's finance chief, Jon Moeller, told analysts that higher pricing may affect sales volume.

Kimberly-Clark Corp. executives said last month that they expect volumes to suffer, particularly with tissue products, after the company implemented price increases averaging in the mid-to-high single digits on a percentage basis. Still, the company, which makes Cottonelle and Scott bathroom tissues and Kleenex facial tissues, predicted organic sales should increase 2 percent for 2019.

Companies that don't have a mix of high- and low-priced products find it harder to pull off price increases, said Bernstein analyst Ali Dibadj, because they risk losing price-sensitive customers for good. "The big fear is your pricing is too high and that consumers are just not going to come back to your brand," he said.

By Aisha Al-Muslim

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