July 22, 2019
Latest News

Love of fine food tops controversy over immigration in US

By Tania Cidoncha

Portland, Oregon, Jun 22 (efe-epa).- Regardless of whether cooks who make salsa, tacos, Moroccan cake or paella are immigrants, Americans love their cuisine and leave aside all the hatred and resentment stirred up by certain politicians against the waves of migrants.

What everyone knows is that US citizens will never give up cuisines from across the seas and will certainly refuse to survive on barbecues and fast foods.

Francisco Castañeda, a native of Mexico and owner of a food cart of dishes typical of his country, told EFE that this is "a good way for us to interact with them and also for them it's a way to communicate with us."

"Our food is something we know they like," added Castañeda, manager of one of the busiest places in the famous gastronomic city of Portland, Oregon.

But this kind of interaction, fully accepted and in which both groups enjoy excellent relations, helps foreigners integrate, since with a succulent dish with Mediterranean aromas, the US customer won't even think about where the chef came from, and even less about having the person deported.

A lady who routinely buys Greek dishes from a food cart said of that cuisine, "It's just so good. I mean it's different" and in her opinion is better than typical American food.

This love for previously unknown flavors has become something of universal interest, as indicated by the number of TV programs covering the delights of the kitchen.

Oddly enough, this is something more to be found in the US, according to a recent study by the YouGov company, taken together with seven European countries.

Of the 1,200 people asked in the US, 50 percent said "food" was what the country gains most from immigration, while 43 percent said that local businesses and economies were the segments most favored, while 42 percent named culture.

The survey said that, even with a government with zero tolerance for the undocumented, the US is the country that most favors immigration. The poll noted that one out of every four Americans believes that foreigners do more good than harm.

But US chefs and restaurateurs are also enriched by the cultural exchange.

Nate Thilen, one of Portland's most important restaurateurs, owner among others of the Bar Casa Vale restaurant, said that immigration is incredibly important for US cuisine.

Food and culture are transported into this country by immigrants "bringing their history, their ideas, their family lineage, things that we don't know about yet, and they're bringing them to where we live and sharing them with us. And that's how we learn," he said.

"If we kept everything internal and never looked outside then we would just be in a perpetual cycle and wouldn't go anywhere," said Thilen, an American inspired by Spanish tapas.

Also the owner of the Provision Foods delicatessen, Thilen thanks foreigners for helping him be "passionate about where I come from."

"We've got wonderful oceans and mountains, pastures, produce and farmlands that are amazing. And seeing my land through their eyes, I understand my place better," he added

Javier Canteras, born in Bilbao, Spain, and whose parents emigrated to the US when he was 5 years old, is the chef and proprietor of the Basque restaurant Urdaneta.

His idea about the total of dishes from other latitudes is based on getting Americans to give up their bad eating habits, which seriously affects their health.

"In my restaurant, that's what we do. People that come here and they eat, we keep them here for two or three hours. And you have to sit here...and it's good food and it's healthy. It's local. So we try to impart that mentality. We're educating people on the traditions of Spain," Canteras said.

Aside from love, food is the most universal silent language, said the chef, who believes his responsibility is also to educate his customers about Spanish traditions and show them what they can find in the Basque Country or in Andalusia.

"People take trips to Spain and then come back to the restaurant later and just say, 'you were so right,'" Canteras said.

Americans in general accept the benefits of immigration to their diets and, according to the National Restaurant Association, 29 percent of the restaurant business is run by immigrants.

News history

By María Rodríguez

Tame elephants mediate between humans, wild elephants in Indonesia's Aceh

By Ricardo Perez-Solero,

Buddhist novices perform rituals in mass ordination ceremony

Thai and foreign Buddhist devotees took part in several rituals Saturday as part of a mass ordination ceremony at Wat Phra Dhammakaya temple on the...

Princess Mako honors memory of Japanese who died in Bolivia

Okinawa I, Bolivia, Jul 19 (efe-epa).- Princess Mako of Japan honored this Friday the memory of her migrant compatriots who died in Bolivia at a monument in...

Indonesia to close Komodo Island to protect indigenous dragons

Jakarta, Jul 19 (efe-epa).- Komodo Island, a popular tourist destination and home to the world’s largest lizards, will close in 2020 in a bid to protect its...

First library seeks to bring change to Pakistani gun-making town

By Jaime Leon

Indonesian Hindus flock to Mt. Bromo volcano for soul-cleansing

Tenggerese Hindus gathered on top of Mount Bromo, an active volcano in East Java, Indonesia, for a purification ritual.

KLM diktat to cover up while breastfeeding in flights causes global outrage

The Hague, Netherlands, Jul 18 (efe-epa).- Dutch airline KLM is facing a storm of criticism for asking mothers to cover up while breastfeeding their babies...

Recruiting armies of bugs to chomp back Florida's invasive plants

By Ana Mengotti

DR Congo vaccinates Goma to curb Ebola expansion

Kinshasa, July 17 (efe-epa).- The Democratic Republic of Congo is planning to vaccinate about 100 people in the northeastern city of Goma who had contact...

US judge denies bail to church leader accused of child rape, pornography

Los Angeles, USA, Jul 16 (efe-epa).- The leader of the so-called "Luz del Mundo" ("Light of the World") church will remain imprisoned in a United States...

Dried-up Aculeo Lagoon shows the woes of climate change in Chile

By Alberto Peña

By Nerea González

Trump doubles down on tweets against Democratic congresswomen

By Lucia Leal.

Residents of historic Panama neighborhood fight gentrification

By Maria M.Mur.

National health alert in Philippines after over 450 dengue deaths

Manila, Jul 15 (efe-epa).- Philippines on Monday declared a national alert due to a dengue outbreak, with over 106,630 cases recorded in the first half of...

San Juan Parangaricutiro, Mexico's Pompeii buried by Paricutin volcano

By Manuel Soberanes Cobo

The Japanese island in the heart of South America

By Gina Baldivieso

More and more reports of sexual abuse against minors in Panama

By Ana de Leon

Protesters in US urge end to migrant detention centers

By Laura Barros

US lawmakers spotlight conditions for migrant kids detained on the border

Washington, Jul 12 (efe-epa).- With fear of the guards, feeling ill, with little sleep and no soap in sight, so the hours go by for thousands of children...

Japanese government apologizes for discriminating against lepers for decades

Tokyo, Jul 12 (efe-epa).- The prime minister of Japan on Friday apologized to leprosy patients and their families who suffered discrimination and isolation...

Trump gives up on adding citizenship question to 2020 Census

Washington, Jul 11 (efe-epa).- President Donald Trump on Thursday abandoned his bid to have a question about citizenship added to the 2020 US Census,...

Pelosi says Trump is terrorizing immigrants with threat of raids

Washington, Jul 11 (efe-epa).- The speaker of the US House of Representatives, Nancy Pelosi, said Thursday that President Donald Trump's threats to round-up...

I agree Welcome to news4europe.eu. We use cookies to improve your online experience. Find out more.